ChatGPT knows if you have a shitty culture

May 28, 2024 Maddie Grant

As an experiment, I asked ChatGPT to give me examples of ten associations and ten nonprofits who have bad workplace cultures, with data to back it up. Here’s what it gave me:

Here is a list of ten large associations (membership organizations) known for having had issues with their workplace cultures, along with the data used to make these assessments:

  1. American Bar Association (ABA)
    – Data:Internal surveys and anonymous employee reviews on sites like Glassdoor have indicated issues with management, work-life balance, and internal communication.
  2. National Rifle Association (NRA)
    – Data: Reports from former employees and media investigations have highlighted problems related to internal politics, leadership issues, and a lack of transparency.
  3. American Medical Association (AMA)
    – Data: Employee reviews and surveys have pointed out issues with bureaucracy, slow decision-making processes, and a hierarchical culture that can stifle innovation.
  4. AARP
    – Data: Feedback from employees on platforms like Indeed and Glassdoor has mentioned challenges with management, organizational change, and internal communication.
  5. National Education Association (NEA)
    – Data: Employee reviews and external audits have revealed issues with leadership, workplace morale, and the effectiveness of internal processes.
  6. American Psychological Association (APA)
    – Data: Internal surveys and employee feedback have indicated problems with organizational structure, communication, and management practices.
  7. American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA)
    – Data: Employee reviews and feedback have pointed to issues with management, workplace culture, and job satisfaction.
  8. Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM)
    – Data: Employee reviews and industry reports have highlighted concerns with leadership, organizational change, and workplace culture.
  9. American Dental Association (ADA)
    – Data: Employee reviews on Glassdoor and internal surveys have indicated issues with management, workplace environment, and communication.
  10. American Association of Retired Persons (AARP)
    – Data: Reports from employees and media articles have mentioned problems with management practices, workplace morale, and organizational culture.
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These assessments are based on a combination of employee reviews from sites like Glassdoor and Indeed, internal surveys, media investigations, and external audits where available. These sources provide insights into the internal workings and culture of these organizations from the perspective of their employees.

And here are ten large nonprofits that have been reported to have had issues with their workplace cultures, along with the data used to assess these issues:

  1. American Red Cross
    – Data: Reports from ProPublica and NPR have highlighted issues such as mismanagement, inadequate disaster response, and concerns about internal culture.
  2. Oxfam
    – Data: Internal investigations and media reports revealed cases of sexual harassment and misconduct among staff, especially highlighted by the 2018 Haiti scandal.
  3. United Way
    – Data: Employee reviews on Glassdoor and reports from news outlets have pointed out issues with internal communication, management practices, and organizational transparency.
  4. Save the Children
    – Data: Media reports and internal reviews have indicated problems with leadership, allegations of sexual misconduct, and issues with workplace morale.
  5. The Salvation Army
    – Data: Employee reviews and reports from advocacy groups have mentioned concerns about discrimination, workplace practices, and leadership issues.
  6. Greenpeace
    – Data: Reports from employees and media investigations have highlighted issues with workplace culture, including allegations of bullying and harassment.
  7. Amnesty International
    – Data: An independent review in 2019 revealed a toxic workplace culture, including issues of bullying, discrimination, and high levels of stress among employees.
  8. World Wildlife Fund (WWF)
    – Data: A BuzzFeed News investigation in 2019 exposed allegations of human rights abuses and poor management practices within some of WWF’s programs.
  9. Planned Parenthood
    – Data: Employee reviews and media reports have pointed to issues with internal communication, management, and workplace culture, especially during periods of organizational change.
  10. UNICEF
    – Data: Reports from employees and internal reviews have highlighted concerns about workplace culture, including issues with harassment, discrimination, and leadership practices.
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These assessments are based on employee reviews from platforms like Glassdoor and Indeed, internal surveys, media investigations, and independent reviews. These sources provide insights into the workplace culture and internal challenges faced by these large nonprofits.

Do you work for one of these organizations?  How true is this? 

If it’s true, you (yes you) can move the needle on culture – our new book Culture Change Made Easy tells you how, no matter where you sit in the organization.

Do you want to work for one of these organizations?  Ask ChatGPT for some intel before you apply – might save you hours of scouring Glassdoor and Indeed – but then validate by talking to some actual employees (or former employees).

Do you work somewhere else, but want to know what ChatGPT knows about your org? Perhaps it’s time to ask… then do something about any negative stuff. (We can help.)

 

Maddie Grant

Maddie Grant, CAE, is an expert culture designer and digital strategist who focuses on helping organizations unlock the power in their culture and navigate culture change. She has specific expertise in digital transformation and generational differences in the workplace. She has explored the language of workplace culture for several years through her books, co-authored with her partner in business and life Jamie Notter, including Humanize: How People-Centric Organizations Succeed in a Social World (2011), the Amazon category best-seller When Millennials Take Over: Preparing for the Ridiculously Optimistic Future of Business (2015), the Non-Obvious Guide to Employee Engagement (2019), and Culture Change Made Easy, coming out in Fall 2023.